The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Tennessee County Municipal Advisory Service

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Step 6: Monitor the Project

Reference Number: MTAS-1253
Tennessee Code Annotated
Reviewed Date: October 05, 2017
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A critical role for the project owner is monitoring the project. This generally is done in conjunction with the utility staff. The owners of the project, the city or utility board, along with their staff, managers, engineers and inspectors, must evaluate the project and their own performances relative to the project.

Inspection of the work is critical to a successful project. The inspector must be qualified.  He or she should clearly understand the design, should know the latest construction methods and must clearly know the owner’s expectations. Owners must clearly state those expectation. It is suggested that expectations should be similar to the following statement, “Construction shall be consistent with design, shall be completed with quality materials consistent with the design, shall be completed with construction methods of the highest quality in a way that preserves worker and public safety.”

The design itself should meet design criteria set by the state. That design and the equipment choices should meet the approval of operations and management personnel. These people, along with the engineer, should be able to give an assurance that the design will produce a water quality that meets, at a minimum, the regulatory standards. There should be a level of comfort among the financial staff that the project and subsequent operational expenses are affordable. As construction begins, remind all personnel — from the professionals to the least experienced laborer — that a high-quality project is expected. Specified materials must be installed according to design, using construction methods that result in a long-lasting project and are on budget and on time. The contractor and inspector both should document daily activities and progress on the construction site. Payment requests will be made based on the construction progress. Make payments to the contractor quickly. If there are disputes regarding payment requests, reconcile them quickly, preferably using a previously agreed upon method.

In a four-part article in Operators Forum entitled “The Operator’s Key to Successful Plant Upgrades,” the authors recommended that a treatment plant staff person called a coordinator is key to improving relations with contractors, subcontractors, engineers, and operators of the facility. Where a third-party project manager is not affordable, this may be an alternative. Though not in control of the project, a coordinator could serve many functions of a project manager by keeping the parties working as partners and serving as the eyes and ears of the owners.

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